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Archive - 2006

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January 25th

Our time here is just a vapor

Then I realized even more miners were trapped, underground, with little chance for survival.
Now, I will be the first to admit that I don’t know anything about mining, what all of the dangers are, how to prevent them and how to recognize them. But, with West Virginia miners and their families facing this tribulation twice in one month, I think something needs to change. The oxygen canisters the miners are sent down with oxygen tanks that only produce about an hour of oxygen.
That’s not quite enough.

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Hurricane forum gives opportunity

“We want to keep the discussion open and encourage dialogue,” Hankins said. “I want people to open up and tell their stories. Part of this is part of the rebuilding effort for Hurricane Katrina.”
“In the Cross Hairs: Louisiana’s Hurricane Experiences”, Hankins’ three-part lecture, places its main focus on Isaac’s Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History — a book by Erik Austin about the 1900 hurricane in Galveston, Texas.

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Katrina mystery illness may have a name

The disease is nicknamed “Katrina Rash” and the “New Orleans Crud,” and has affected at least three Ruston-area first-responders who went to New Orleans to help in rescue and recovery efforts.
A Lincoln Parish Sheriff’s Deputy, an Emergency Medical Technician and a Louisiana State Trooper all came down with variations of the ailment.
Missy Staples, a licensed vocational nurse from Glasgow, Ky., became ill after caring for a patient with similar symptoms. She says the ailment could become an epidemic.

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Library’s hurricane lectures continue

Jeffery Hankins, a history professor at Louisiana Tech University, will lead interested attendees in a discussion about hurricanes and the book Isaac’s Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History by Erik Larson, which deals with the Galveston, Texas, hurricane of 1900.
Hankins said last week’s program went well, and he was expecting more people to attend the next two.
“We talked about meteorology, and I had a power point program on how hurricanes form,” Hankins said. “I introduced the book, and we will pick up on that tomorrow night.”

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January 23rd

Elliott’s toughness helps Bulldogs win

So when Louisiana Tech University needed to upgrade its intensity level and maintain its lead over the Aggies, he knew right where to turn.
Marcus Elliott.
“He’s the kind of player who brings toughness to both ends of the floor, especially on the defensive end,” Richard said of the junior guard from Ft. Walton Beach, Fla. “He’s what we needed in there in this type of game and he brought us not only toughness, but some big plays offensively and defensively.”
How he did.

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Ruston is changing — quickly

Many things have changed in the past 15 years, when I first left Ruston as a 9-year-old. Brace yourself though, because they aren’t finished yet.
With the recent reopening of the Dixie Center for the Arts, known to my mother when she was growing up as the Dixie Theater, I’m reminded of the old saying, “The more things change, the more they stay the same.”
Ruston will always and forever be a small, Southern town. It will never be confused for Shreveport, Baton Rouge or New Orleans.

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Support our local arts

While much of the credit can go to the long-awaited return of the Dixie Theater, now known as the Dixie Center for the Arts, the local arts scene actually goes much deeper.
From the plays put on by the Ruston Community Theater to the many local artists and art shows, there are many opportunities around Ruston to help keep the arts alive.
The North Central Louisiana Arts Council, who along with the RCT and Ruston Civic Symphony will be housed at the Dixie, promote a variety of programs throughout the area to help preserve and enhance the arts.

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Officials take a lot of abuse

The banter on sports talk radio this week has been about blown calls during the pro football playoffs, while anyone who has attended a Louisiana Tech University men’s or women’s basketball game this year would swear the refs don’t have a clue.
But, whether you like these men and women or not, you have to admire them. On every call, half of the crowd thinks they’re wrong and lets them know it.
At the Thomas Assembly Center on the Tech campus, I have heard officials called stupid, morons, idiots and blind. And that’s just what I can print in a family paper.

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Friends’ efforts at parish library need support

Even if a person can not afford the price of a new book, libraries offer an opportunity to read for free through the use of a library card.
Lincoln Parish is blessed to have one of the finest public libraries in the state. It offers a range of reading materials that includes books, magazines, newspapers and the Internet. It also provides programs such as G.O.A.L. — Grade One At the Library — which provides all first and second graders in Lincoln Parish public schools with a library card.

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Keeping Hometown Spirit alive

I have recently been thinking of the benefits of all three.
The varied and rich benefits of our area’s educational, socioeconomic and spiritual heritage is something which is carried with us for a lifetime. No matter what geographical journey our lives may take, that makes the journey with us. It provides the foundation for an adulthood which is also enriched.
The senior years may be spent in the vast resources of this area in abundance which will enhance the latter years. Not only are there a number of senior living complexes, but there are also a vast supply of resources.

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