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Archive - Feb 5, 2007

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Colts ride high as NFL champs

“It means probably more to him than it does to any of us,” Colts defensive end Dwight Freeney said. “He has waited a long time.”
The weather was the worst in Super Bowl history, with steady rain from start to finish, and it suited Dungy and his Colts just fine. When the slick ball forced them to rein in their potent passing game, their defense and running game assumed a championship-caliber share of the load.
“We showed we could win many ways,” Dungy said.

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Women key to advances

College of Engineering and Science Dean Stan Napper points to an active chapter of the Society of Women Engineers as one reason for Tech’s high percentage of women graduate students. He said chapter members served as mentors and provided motivation for the students.
Like other employment fields, Napper said those looking to hire engineers are seeking a more diverse workplace. Napper said Tech’s graduates have resulted in early, multiple and lucrative job offers.

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Here’s your chance to be a hero

The three drives will act as a competition among the universities as they strive to get more than 15,000 people to come out and get tested so their names can be put on the national registry of possible bone marrow donors.
The drives are from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. today at Tech, Tuesday at ULM and Wednesday at GSU in an effort to reach as many people as possible.
Spending five minutes filling out personal information and getting your mouth swabbed is easy enough. Doing this puts you on the registry and makes you eligible to receive that call that could make you someone’s hero.

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Drives promote search for heroes

To help shorten their wait, the Friends of James Christopher, joined by Louisiana Tech University, the University of Louisiana at Monroe and Grambling State University, will hold “Heroes Save Lives Bone Marrow Drives” this week on the university campuses.
Sue Ellen Cascio, coordinator of the three drives and creator of the Friends of James Christopher organization, said the idea for the drives came from three ULM students, and she thought it would be a great opportunity to reach as many potential donors as possible.

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Tech roasts Razorbacks

Today, the two clubs face off in the series finale starting at 1 p.m.
“It’s the rubber game in the series and I know our guys are going to be ready just as theirs are, so it should be an exciting completion to the series,” said head coach Wade Simoneaux of Tech. “If we could win two of out three here, it would be huge. But you don’t see our guys celebrating that much today. They know Arkansas is a very good team and that this is just one game. It’s a good win, of course, but it’s just one game and one win.”

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GSU vice president resigns

Grambling President Horace Judson said Owens had been a significant player in getting GSU’s recertification with the Southern Association of Colleges Board.
“Grambling was facing the reconstruction of its financial records when Billy came here,” Judson said. “That, along with the other extra challenges he met during recertification went a long way toward
removing the SACs probation and getting the university recertified.”
Hudson said a search would begin soon for Owens’ replacement.

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A chance to save lives

If you are selected as a candidate, further tests and examinations will be conducted before you would be asked to donate marrow. If you are selected as a donor, about 1,000 ml. of marrow (five percent of a person’s total) is extracted from the hip. The marrow replenishes itself within two weeks. The procedure requires an overnight stay at a hospital, after which donors usually return to normal activities within a week. The most common side effect is soreness. In fact, most donors express a willingness to donate again in the future.

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Voices soar in sweet sounds of proud praise

At the other end of the spectrum was 92-year-old Jess Harper from Mahalia, Texas. During World War II, Harper was a flight engineer on a bomber in the European Theater of Operations. On his 43rd mission, his airplane was shot down and he spent 11 months in a German prisoner of war camp.
“I lost a few pounds,” he told me with a sly grin on his face.What he didn’t lose was his faith in his Creator and his joy of singing praises to that same Creator. Harper took his turn in front of the more than 200 singers, unashamed of showing his love through song of his Savior.

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