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Archive - Jun 4, 2007

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Rike could go high in draft

The junior outfielder is being listed as one of the primary candidates for the annual major league draft, being projected as anywhere from a third-to-10th round choice.
In the recent Draft Preview edition of Baseball America, the lefthanded swinging native of Richmond, Texas was included on a list of the draft’s top 200 candidates. Collegiate Baseball recently had his going in the first six rounds of the late week draft that will be televised live and nationally for the first time ever by ESPN2.

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Selective admissions boosts scores

Also, five of the 11 campuses reported a jump of at least 3/10 of a point, which, according to the Board of Regents’ report, is a significant one-year increase.
It is apparent the selective admissions standards at Tech have provided a more streamlined student.
“We’ve had selective admissions since 1992, and it’s made a tremendous difference for us,” said Tech President Dan Reneau. “It made a big difference in graduation rates and the quality of the student body.”

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Protecting skin beautiful thing

It seems many people would rather be “beautiful” — that is tan — now than avoid developing wrinkled skin, sunspots or much worse — cancer — later.
According to information provided by the American Cancer Society, skin cancer is the most common of all cancers, accounting for nearly half of cancer cases in the United States.
More than one million cases of nonmelanoma skin cancer are found in this country each year.

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Mock explosion drill planned

The drill is scheduled to begin around 9 a.m. and could last into the afternoon, he said. A group critique will be held at 3 p.m. Tuesday at Northern Louisiana Medical Center.
“What I really what to focus on is all the groups working together,” Tornabene said. “We have 44 patients so we are going to stress the hospital out a little this time. Obviously as soon as firefighters get there, they’ll set up incident command. I would just like to see how quickly we can get officers there, with the one caveat that I don’t want any emergency traffic. When you come to a red light, stop.”

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Barry Sanders: no regrets

Whoosh!
Just like that.
Snap a finger and Barry was gone, no longer making those vintage cuts-on-a-dime or registering another four-digit rushing yard total, a remarkable feat that he did in each of his 10 years in the league.
“I knew the minute the ’98 season was over that it was the end for me,” Sanders reflected in an inteview with The Daily Leader during the annual Louisiana Tech Univeristy-hosted CHAMPS Celebration events held here this past weekend. “I knew I wasn’t coming back.

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Reneau needs to stick around

At the top of the list of the strong points the report found at the Ruston school was its leadership — especially that provided by Reneau. The report suggested the state of Louisiana use all means at its disposal to retain Reneau as president.
“We believe that it is important that President Reneau remain in office for at least the next several years and recommend that the state and Board of Supervisors provide sufficient incentives to retain him.”

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It's good to have Malone back home

To say that Malone has been blessed is an understatement: the athletically gifted NBA legend was named one of the 50 greatest players ever and was rewarded financially for his efforts and hard work. It would have been easy for Malone to rest on his laurels after his playing days were over and do as so many former athletes have done: wind up in the news for all of the wrong reasons.
But Malone has been different. Since his return to his roots after his retirement from the NBA he has been a model citizen, continuing to work, while at the same time enjoying the fruit of his labor.

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Education leaders unveil vision

“Many of the jobs of the future will require some kind of post-secondary education,” Levy said, adding that the percentage is likely to be around 60 percent. “We will continue to nurture our four-year schools, but will be making them leaner and more focused on their mission, which no longer include providing remedial courses for those students who are not prepared for a four-year college.”
Levy, also a CABL board member, said the key is to strike a balance — making community and technical schools easier to get into, while tightening the restrictions for the traditional universities.

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