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Arts Club shares history

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Pictured above are some members of the Progressive Arts Club.

The Progressive Arts Club was organized in 1951, starting with a baby shower given in honor of Donzell Malone at the home of Mabel White.

Eva Lewis was elected the first president; Janie Mae Henderson, vice president; Mable White, secretary; and Eunice Hammock, treasurer. Each member present was asked to bring a new member. At the next meeting the four members were joined by four more; namely Alverne Smith, Gertie M. Jackson, Mattie Chaffers and Mattie Richmond (three now deceased).
The Club of "12" Christian women were joined together with a motto, "Love One Another.” The colors, red and white were chosen, signifying the love of Jesus Christ as he died on Calvary.
The name Progressive Arts Club was suggested by a friend, Mary Helen Duncan, deceased. The culture of the club is arts and crafts, with civic affairs affiliated.

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