SUbscriber Login | NEW SUBSCRIPTION  

New world mark set for catfish

  • warning: Parameter 2 to ad_flash_adapi() expected to be a reference, value given in /var/www/vhosts/rustonleader.com/httpdocs/includes/module.inc on line 497.
  • warning: Parameter 2 to ad_flash_adapi() expected to be a reference, value given in /var/www/vhosts/rustonleader.com/httpdocs/includes/module.inc on line 497.
  • warning: Parameter 2 to ad_flash_adapi() expected to be a reference, value given in /var/www/vhosts/rustonleader.com/httpdocs/includes/module.inc on line 497.
  • warning: Parameter 2 to ad_flash_adapi() expected to be a reference, value given in /var/www/vhosts/rustonleader.com/httpdocs/includes/module.inc on line 497.
  • warning: Parameter 2 to ad_flash_adapi() expected to be a reference, value given in /var/www/vhosts/rustonleader.com/httpdocs/includes/module.inc on line 497.
in
080110 CATFISH BLUE C.jpg
Greg Bernal landed this whopping 130-pound blue catfish in Missouri recently. It is destined to become a new world record. Bernal was fishing the Missouri River near its confluence with the Mississippi when he made the big catch.

What must it be like to catch a fish that ends up in the record book? It has to provide a rush like nothing else.

I was at the right place at the right time on a humid night in May back in 1976 when I had a brush with the record book. No, I didn’t catch a record fish but my then teen aged nephew, Tommy, did. He and I were fishing with his dad — my brother, Tom — on Lake Claiborne out of my boat, casting spinners for bass around the pier out from Bo Peterson’s camp at Pleasure Point when Tommy tied into what we thought was a good bass.

It turns out that what Tommy hooked and landed was a giant chain pickerel — that’s a “jack fish” to north Louisiana anglers. We gave thought to tossing the toothy ugly specimen back in the drink when I remembered seeing information recently about the state fish records. I didn’t recall seeing chain pickerel on the list so I suggested that Tommy keep the fish, take it back home to DeRidder the next day and have a fisheries biologist officially weigh the big jack and see what might happen.

Full text of this article is available to subscribers only. Login if you are already a subscriber. If you are not a subscriber, you can subscribe to the online version here.

Bookmark and Share